FAQ

What if it rains after the application?

Most of the time, that’s great! To provide maximum performance every application requires irrigation for the plant to use the products that are applied. It can be in the form of either rainfall or irrigation by the homeowner. However, it there is an unexpected heavy shower to appear as the application is applied, it can affect the weed control. If there are concerns, reach out and we will stand behind our work. If the application has time to dry, it will be fine. For more information:  Lawn Help

How long should I wait before mowing after the application?

We recommend waiting at least 24-48 hours before and after the application before the lawn is mowed. We discourage bagging your clipping unless the lawn has excessive thatch. Clipping are beneficial because they restore nutrients back into the soil.

How do I pay?

We make this part really easy. Simply choose the method that works best for you:

  • Send a check along with the invoice our Lawn Care Technician leaves on your door after your service.
  • Log into the Customer section of our website and choose a credit or debit option.
  • Easy Pay/Auto Pay – the most popular option – we safely retain your credit card information and after each treatment your card will charged with your account balance.
  • Money Saving Option – at the beginning of the season we offer our customers an opportunity to pre-pay the scheduled treatments for the rest of the year and enjoy a 5% discount.

Click here to see our Special Offers

Will this application affect my pets? Dogs or Cats?

 All products applied are regulated by EPA and if label instructions are followed properly, there should not be a problem. However, pets do need to stay off the lawn at least until the application dries. We recommend at least a couple of hours. Same applies for you and your family.

How long do my kids and I need to stay off the lawn?

We advise staying off the lawn until the application is completely dry. All products applied are regulated by EPA and if label instructions are followed properly, there should not be a problem. However, your family does need to stay off the lawn at least until the application dries. We recommend at least a couple of hours. Same applies for your pets.

How many treatments does my lawn need?

 Keeping your lawn weed free is both a science and an art. Each yard is unique and may require different, and multiple, applications techniques to achieve the results we all want. Please understand that one application will help, but obviously not completely eradicate your problem. Therefore, multiple applications may be required for your lawn to reach its full potential of becoming weed free and healthy. See our Lawn Care Program here for more information.

Why do I still have Nutgrass, Dallisgrass, or Onions?

Some weeds are more difficult to control than others. A general rule of thumb is that perennial weeds (tend to live for several years) are more difficult to control than an annual weeds (come back year after year.) The pre-emergent applications we apply help prevent weeds from germinating. However, pre-emergent applications are not effective on certain weeds such as Nutgrass and Dallisgrass. These type of weeds require post-emergent applications to control, and can be very difficult to eradicate completely.

Do I have to sign a contract?

Quite simply, NO. We do business the old fashion way; we shake hands.  It’s actually a verbal agreement; we agree to work hard to keep your lawn weed free and you agree to pay us for that hard work. That’s it.

What kind of guarantee do you offer?

We stand behind our work 100%. We are driven to provide the absolute best service and we will do whatever necessary to make and keep our customer family thrilled with our service. Keeping your lawn weed free is both a science and an art. Each yard is unique and may require different, and multiple, applications techniques to achieve the results we all want. We ask our customers to allow 10-14 days after each treatment to see incremental improvement. If it’s not what we said you’d see, or if you’re just not as happy as you can be, we’ll come back and re-evaluate or retreat if necessary. Whatever it takes. Please understand that one application will help, but obviously not completely eradicate your problem. Therefore, multiple applications may be required for your lawn to reach its full potential of becoming weed free and healthy.

Click here to see Our Guarantee page for details.

Why do I have yellow spots in my lawn?

During our summer treatments, especially under drought stress, it is not uncommon for the lawn to discolor in some small areas. This is only temporary and will recover in a matter of days. Irrigating the areas will speed up its recovery.

Why do I still have weeds?

 That’s a great question. Timing and selection of herbicides are vital for the success of a weed management strategy. There are many products available for licensed professionals. Some products do better on some weeds than others. At 4-Evergreen, we note and monitor conditions on the lawn to help provide us with the right strategy for your lawn. Here are the main weeds in our area that are difficult to control and what our strategy is with them.

 

  • Cool Weather Weeds
    • Poa Annua: Poa Annua germinates a lot sooner in the fall as do other weeds. Early Pre-Emergent in late August will help in germination. Poa Annua has developed known herbicide resistance to Simizine and Round Up. This weed is active in fall, winter, and spring weed.
    • Star of Bethlehem: This weed germinates in the fall and stays active in the same areas year after year until summertime temperatures arrive. There are no Pre-Emergent’s that totally prevents germination. There are Post-Emergent’s available for its control and they are more costly. Digging up is sometimes the best option.
    • American Burnweed: (aka Fireweed) Fireweed germinates in early spring and can easily be control once it is up. Unfortunately, the seed of this weed stays in the thatch layer, where it germinates, and usually the Pre-Emergent applied gets below the area of germination. Spraying or hand pulling (very easy to pull up) are the best ways to get rid of them.

 

  • Warm Weather Weeds
    • Dallisgrass: Dallisgrass is a perennial and is very difficult to control. MSMA was a better product for many years to use but is no longer available to lawn care professionals. There are other alternatives but they are costly and require multiple application to control.
    • Goosegrass: This weed germinates later in the spring, a few weeks after crabgrass. Pre-Emergents may help but not totally take care of it. It generally grows in compacted soils so aerating the lawn will help. MSMA was a great product for many years to use but is no longer available to lawn care professionals. There are other alternatives but they are costly and require multiple application to control.
    • Nutsedge: (water grass)This weed produces underground bulbs and only a select few Pre-Emergent’s will help in its germination and they are costly. Post-Emergent’s are available for control. This is a summertime weed.

What weeds will my Pre-Emergent NOT keep from coming up?

Another great question. Timing and selection of herbicides are vital for the success of a weed management strategy. There are many products available for licensed professionals. Some products do better on some weeds than others. At 4-Evergreen, we note and monitor conditions on the lawn to help provide us with the right strategy for your lawn. Here are the main weeds in our area that are difficult to control and what our strategy is with them.

 

  • Cool Weather Weeds
    • Poa Annua: Poa Annua germinates a lot sooner in the fall as do other weeds. Early Pre-Emergent in late August will help in germination. Poa Annua has developed known herbicide resistance to Simizine and Round Up. This weed is active in fall, winter, and spring weed.
    • Star of Bethlehem: This weed germinates in the fall and stays active in the same areas year after year until summertime temperatures arrive. There are no Pre-Emergent’s that totally prevents germination. There are Post-Emergent’s available for its control and they are more costly. Digging up is sometimes the best option.
    • American Burnweed: (aka Fireweed) Fireweed germinates in early spring and can easily be control once it is up. Unfortunately, the seed of this weed stays in the thatch layer, where it germinates, and usually the Pre-Emergent applied gets below the area of germination. Spraying or hand pulling (very easy to pull up) are the best ways to get rid of them.

 

  • Warm Weather Weeds
    • Dallisgrass: Dallisgrass is a perennial and is very difficult to control. MSMA was a better product for many years to use but is no longer available to lawn care professionals. There are other alternatives but they are costly and require multiple application to control.
    • Goosegrass: This weed germinates later in the spring, a few weeks after crabgrass. Pre-Emergents may help but not totally take care of it. It generally grows in compacted soils so aerating the lawn will help. MSMA was a great product for many years to use but is no longer available to lawn care professionals. There are other alternatives but they are costly and require multiple application to control.
    • Nutsedge: (water grass)This weed produces underground bulbs and only a select few Pre-Emergent’s will help in its germination and they are costly. Post-Emergent’s are available for control. This is a summertime weed.

Should I have a soil analysis pulled?

 YES, no doubt about it.  A soil analysis gives you the necessary information to get you lawn down to a science. If you lawn is too acidic, which a lot are in this area, then you lawn will not be able to use certain elements of fertilizer that is applied. It also brings clarity to your fertilization strategy by informing you of nutrients that are needed and nutrients that are not.

What height should I mow my Common Bermuda Lawn?

 Never cut more than 1/3 of the grass blade on each mowing. Mow common Bermuda Grass during the growing season at a height of 3″ to 4″to maintain the lawns color and health. Early in the spring, it is ok to mow it a little lower to encourage green up.  (2.5”-3”) Make sure a cold snap is not in the near future.

What height should I grow my Hybrid Bermuda Lawn?

 Never cut more than 1/3 of the grass blade on each mowing. Mow Hybrid Bermuda Grass at height of 2″ to 3″. Try to avoid mowing the lawn too short, as this will cause more weed pressure and make the lawn more susceptible to drought stress and disease related problems.

What height should I mow my Zoysia Lawn?

 Never cut more than 1/3 of the grass blade on each mowing. Mowing Zoysia Grass too low can cause discoloration and plant injury. The recommended mowing height for Zoysia is 3″ to 4″ to provide a protective shield for the roots and to also maintain good turf color. Early in the spring, it is ok to mow it a little lower to encourage green up. (2.5”-3”) Make sure a cold snap is not in the near future.

What height should I mow my Fescue/Rye Lawn?

 Mowing Fescue Grass at a minimum height of 3”-4″ is recommended for the lawn to keep good color while helping to choke out weeds. During hot and dry weather, raise the mowing height at least a 1/2″ to avoid plant injury.

How much should I water my lawn?

 If substantial rainfall does not occur, then the lawn will need to be watered. Lawns will need enough rainfall or water to thoroughly soak the roots for the lawn to thrive. To ensure your lawn reaches its full potential, at least1/4″ of water is recommended at least two times a week, especially in dry conditions. We encourage heavy soakings (twice per week) instead of lighter more frequent waterings (daily.)

When is the best time to start the service?

 That a great question. The answer is now. Even though Pre-Emergents are important in your weed control strategy, as too is feeding (fertilizer) the lawn for color and turf density. The best weed defense for lawn is a healthy and thick stand of grass. The fact is, the sooner you start, the sooner you will get your lawn to reach its potential.

How long should it take for my weeds to die?

 Herbicides activity are often affected by two things. First, temperatures will determine how fast the plant takes in the herbicide. The cooler the temperatures, the slower the weeds will respond to the application. In cool months, it is not uncommon to take 3-4 weeks to visually see the results of the application. In the summertime in may be seen in just a few hours. Secondly, conditions play a very important role as well. In dry conditions the plant will go more into a dormant state and its pores in the leaf tissue will close. Therefore, herbicides will not be absorbed and no control is achieved. Once there is rainfall or irrigation, the plant opens back up its pores, and herbicides, if still available, will be taken in and do its job.

Do I need fertilizer?

 Yes, if any curb appeal is desired. Fertilizer plays a major role in not only your lawns health, but also in keeping weeds out. That’s right. The best weed defense is healthy, thick stand of grass. Our lawns need up to 3 feedings throughout their growing season. Our goal is 1 lb of nitrogen per 1000 sqft unless soil analysis calls for a different blend.

How many applications of fertilizer does my lawn need?

 Remember, the best weed defense is healthy, thick stand of grass. Our lawns need up to 3 feedings throughout their growing season. Our goal is 1 lb of nitrogen per 1000 sqft unless soil analysis calls for a different blend.

Does my lawn care provider need to be licensed and insured?

In Tennessee you must have a charter number and be licensed and insured. All charter numbers should be visible on the company vehicle. (example: TN CH#1491) In Missouri, laws are a bit different but licensing and being insured in definitely required.

What is the best type of grass to plant or sod?

 Great question. We see more than you would think of the wrong turf type in the wrong area. We really just break this down by sun vs. shade. Warm season grasses do well in sun areas while cool season grasses do better in filtered sun. Bermuda grass needs 8-10 hours of sunlight daily to thrive. Zoysia grass needs at least 4-6 hours to do well and Fescue/Rye grass needs filtered sunlight but does not do best in full sun.

Should I bag my clippings?

 Frequently bagging your clippings can lead to problems.Understand that all plants carry nutritional value throughout its roots, stems, and leaves. Therefore, it is important to know when mowing, the clippings provide nutritional value that can be reused by the plant once it decomposes. If there is excess clippings, there could be a need for them to be removed. There would need to be a thatch problem or you feel like the excess clippings will smother your lawn.

Are your products safe?

 All products we use are approved by EPA. We are also under the regulation of the Tennessee Department of Agriculture. There should be no concern assuming all label guidelines are followed as directed.

How do I redeem my loyalty rewards points?

You will need to call or message our staff to redeem your loyalty rewards points. 731-264-0088

Do you have references?

 How many do you want? Call the office and we will be happy to provide you with as many as you would like. 731-264-0088 There are plenty of testimonials on Facebook (4-everGreen Lawn Care) and this site under the tab “Testimonials”.